Partner Research and Reports


Supporting Lifelong Families


Ensuring Long-Lasting Permanency and Well-Being

Casey Family Programs (April 2017)
The purpose of this brief is to draw attention to the issue of post-permanency with its focus on the family, and move attention away from re-entry, which focuses on the system. Addressing the gaps in post-permanency practices will strengthen families and prevent children from re-entering care. There are many ways to support families after exiting foster care, including establishing clear funding streams for the most effective post-permanency supports, standardizing data elements to examine who does and does not re-enter care, and conducting rigorous research to identify what has helped support permanency after exiting care.

Supporting Lifelong Families Action Plan

Casey Family Programs (April 2017)
What can your agency do to help address the gaps in post-permanency
services and supports? Consider some of the practice, policy, funding,
data, and related ideas described in this action plan.

California’s Children and Youths’ System of Care: An Agenda to Transform Promises into Practice


California’s Children and Youths’ System of Care: An Agenda to Transform Promises into Practice

Young Minds Advocacy (2017)
The report highlights why children’s mental health is important and why California needs a distinct children-and-youth-focused mental health policy. The report also provides a brief overview of California’s publicly funded mental health system for children and youth; what it has accomplished; and the challenges that remain, including limited access to community-based services, a lack of coordinated care, inadequate data on quality of services, and insufficient system accountability. The report then sets forth a series of recommendations that stakeholders may pursue to overcome the existing challenges and ensure that all young people in California receive the mental health care they need and deserve to live happy successful lives.

Kinreport

The Economic Well-Being of Kin and Non-Kin Caregivers: Comparing Financial Resources, Payment Levels, and Service Supports

University of California , Berkeley (2016)
to examine the economic well-being of kin and non-kin caregivers in select California counties prior to the implementation of the ARC, to understand caregiver characteristics, and the characteristics of the children in their care. The study also included a follow up with caregivers who had indicated at initial contact that they were receiving no funding or TANF funding for the care of their child. We anticipated that some or all of these caregivers would be folded into the ARC over the study period and receive the higher payment rate.

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Study Webinar


From Research to Practice: What Research Tells Us About the Needs of Relatives and How to Translate Findings into Effective Practice. 

Visit the link above to view a recording of a webinar that provides an overview of the study: The Economic Well-Being of Kin and Non-Kin Caregivers
Hear from providers and advocates on model programs and practices, as well as new state policies, that are responsive to these findings and will ultimately help practitioners better support and engage kinship families.

Elements of Effective Practice for Children and Youth Served by Therapeutic Residential Care

Casey Family Programs (2016)
Historically, group homes and residential treatment centers have been an important but controversial part of the child welfare continuum of services — part of a larger cluster of services called “congregate care.”
Group homes and residential treatment centers have been challenged to better define their intervention models and the youth they are best suited to serve within a context of child welfare values that include serving children in the least restrictive alternative settings with the most effective interventions. They have been asked to “right size” lengths of stay, to involve family members more extensively in treatment, to do more than manage problem behaviors by helping youth heal and learn skills for managing their emotions and behaviors that they can use in the community, and to conduct more extensive evaluation studies. States vary substantially in how extensively they use congregate care and for which groups of children and youth.
This research brief summarizes research that identifies key elements of effective practice that are based on the needs of children and youth referred to therapeutic residential care. It also describes how certain interventions and broader systems reforms, when implemented together, can help ensure that the right service, at the right dosage and at the right time, are provided — and for the shortest amount of time necessary — to achieve key therapeutic and permanency planning goals.

taylosangeles

Transition Age Youth and the Child Protection System: Demographic and Case Characteristics – Los Angeles

The Children’s Data Network and The Conrad H. Hilton Foundation (2015)
in partnership with California Department of Social Services
Los Angeles County Department of Children and Family Services
California Child Welfare Indicators Project
USC School of Social Work

tayreportfrontcover

Transition Age Youth and the Child Protection System: Demographic and Case Characteristics - California

The Children’s Data Network and The Conrad H. Hilton Foundation (2015)
in partnership with California Department of Social Services
Los Angeles County Department of Children and Family Services
California Child Welfare Indicators Project
USC School of Social Work

 

CalYOUTH Overview

CalYOUTH Study Brief with Key Findings from the Baseline Youth Survey

Chapin Hall and the California Child Welfare Co-Investment Partnership (2014)

 

CalYOUTH: Conditions of Foster Youth at Age 17

Chapin Hall, The California Department of Social Services, County Welfare Directors Association of California; funding and input provided by: Conrad N. Hilton Foundation, Stuart Foundation, Walter S. Johnson Foundation, Zellerbach Family Foundation, and the Annie E. Casey Foundation (2014)

Worker Survey

CalYOUTH: Early Findings from the Child Welfare Worker Survey

Chapin Hall, The California Department of Social Services, County Welfare Directors Association of California; funding and input provided by: Conrad N. Hilton Foundation, Stuart Foundation, Walter S. Johnson Foundation, Zellerbach Family Foundation, and the Annie E. Casey Foundation (2014)
LCFF
Stuart Foundation and Heising-Simmons Foundation (2014)
Vulnerable Parents
 Conrad N. Hilton Foundation (2013)

PPP

Casey Family Programs (2013)

casey rbs

Casey Family Programs

At Greater Risk

Stuart Foundation (2013)